Interventions to reduce the prevalence of female genital mutilation/cutting in African countries

Interventions to reduce the prevalence of female genital mutilation/cutting in African countries

Female Genital Mutilation/ Cutting (FGM/C) is a traditional practice that involves partial or total removal of the external female genitalia or other injury to the female genital organs for non-medical reasons. FGM/C is mainly practiced on prepubescent girls in 28 countries in Africa. Recent figures for African countries show a prevalence of FGM/C of more than 70% in Burkina Faso, Djibouti, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Guinea, Mali, Mauritania, Northern Sudan, Sierra Leone, and Somalia. However, there is considerable variation in prevalence between and within countries, reflecting ethnicity and tradition. The practice is also rooted in religio-social beliefs within a frame of psycho-sexual and personal reasons such as control of women’s sexuality and family honour, which is enforced by community mechanisms. Girls exposed to FGM/C are at risk of immediate physical consequences, such as severe pain, bleeding, and shock, difficulty in passing urine and faeces, and infections. Long term consequences can include chronic pain and infections. For many girls and women, undergoing FGM/C is a traumatic experience that may adversely affect their mental health. More info →
Estimating the obstetric costs of female genital mutilation in six African countries

Estimating the obstetric costs of female genital mutilation in six African countries

This is a Study done to estimate the cost to the health system of obstetric complications due to female genital mutilation (FGM) in six African countries. The countries are Burkina Faso, Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, Senegal and Sudan. More info →
Mobilize Health Care Providers to Advocate Against FGM/C

Mobilize Health Care Providers to Advocate Against FGM/C

FGM/C has become increasingly medicalized in Kenya’s Abagusii community. However, providers express willingness to advocate against the practice. Interventions to mobilize providers must address not only their financial motivation for providing the service, but also their understanding of the human rights and health consequences of the practice. More info →
Female Genital Mutilation Abandonment in Egypt: Program Manual

Female Genital Mutilation Abandonment in Egypt: Program Manual

This manual is designed as a reference tool for managers, coordinators and implementers administering the FGM Abandonment Program in Egypt describing the program, its components, and activities in a step by step manner. More info →
Related Factors of Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) in Ravansar (Iran)

Related Factors of Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) in Ravansar (Iran)

This study provides statistics and determines the prevalence of FGM in the city of Ravansar, Iran (Iranian Kurdistan). It looks closely at the attitude and knowledge of the Ravansar women towards FGM and the common practices between Iraqi and Iranian Kurdistan where FGM is performed due to proximity. More info →
Clitoral Foreskin Adhesions and Female Sexual Function

Clitoral Foreskin Adhesions and Female Sexual Function

This article describes clitoral foreskin adhesions and reviews the past references to this condition. A retrospective analysis was done to determine the incidence and clinical significance of these adhesions in 271 women seen at a sexual dysfunction clinic. More info →
A State-of-the-Art Synthesis on Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting

A State-of-the-Art Synthesis on Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting

Evidence to End FGM/C: Research to Help Women Thrive is led by the Population Council, Nairobi in partnership with the Africa Coordination Centre for Abandonment of Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting, Kenya (ACCAF); Gender and Reproductive Health & Rights Resource Centre, Sudan (GRACE); Global Research and Advocacy Group, Senegal (GRAG); Population Council, Nigeria; Population Council, Egypt; Population Council, Ethiopia; MannionDaniels, Ltd. (MD); Population Reference Bureau (PRB); University of California, San Diego (Dr. Gerry Mackie); and University of Washington, Seattle (Dr. Bettina Shell-Duncan). More info →