Factors promoting and hindering the practice of female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C)
Female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) is a traditional practice that involves "the partial or total removal of the female external genitalia or other injury to the female genital organs for cultural or other non-therapeutic reasons." The current WHO classification describes four types of FGM/C: Type I, clitoridectomy, involves partial or total removal of the clitoris and/or the prepuce. Type II, excision, involves partial or total removal of the clitoris and the labia minora, with or without excision of the labia majora. Type III, infibulation, involves narrowing of the vaginal orifice with creation of a covering seal by cutting and appositioning the labia minora and/or the labia majora, with or without excision of the clitoris. Type IV, other, involves all other harmful procedures to the female genitalia for non-medical purposes, for example: pricking, piercing, incising, scraping, and cauterization.
Details
Authors: , ,
Genre: Journal Articles
Tags: cutting, Female genital
Publisher: Report from Kunnskapssenteret (Norwegian Knowledge Centre for the Health Services)
Publication Year: 2010
ISBN: 9788281213777