Gynecological consequences of female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C)

Gynecological consequences of female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C)

The traditional practice of female genital mutilation or cutting (FGM/C) covers a range of procedures (clitoridectomy, excision, infi bulation, and other) performed on the genitals of females of different ages. This systematic review aimed to summarize empirical quantitative research describing the gynecological consequences of FGM/C on girls and women. We included 136 primary studies, 42 of which compared groups of women who had been subjected to FGM/C with women who had no or different types of genital alterations. The main finding is that FGM/C has harmful consequences for a woman’s gynecological health. We found that: • Women with FGM/C seem to be more likely than women without FGM/C to experience urinary tract infection, bacterial vaginosis, and pain during intercourse. • There seems to be a trend for women with FGM/C to be more likely than women without FGM/C to experience: burning/painful urination, problems with menstruation, vaginal discharge and vaginal itching. • There seems to be no clear trend for either a greater or lower risk of HIV and sexually transmitted infections among women who have undergone FGM/C. • There were insuffi cient data for us to conclude whether the risk of other gynecological complications (tissue damage, vaginal adhesions and obstructions, cysts, infertility) is different among women with FGM/C compared to women without FGM/C, and whether various FGM/C types differentially affect the risk of other gynecological complications (except regarding urinary tract infection). This systematic review found that sufficient evidence exist to concludethat women who have undergone FGM/C suffer a greater risk of gynecological complications than women who have not undergone the procedure. There were no indications of gynecological benefi ts of FGM/C. Rather, there is a real chance of under-reporting of many of the health issues covered in this systematic review. More info →
Working to End Female Genital Mutilation and Cutting in Tanzania: The Role and Response of the Church

Working to End Female Genital Mutilation and Cutting in Tanzania: The Role and Response of the Church

This study was designed based on quantitative and qualitative research methodologies to understand the current extent of FGM/C in the churches and communities of Mara, Singida and Dodoma Regions, including the nature and extent of the practice. More info →
Islamic Scholars Find No Religious Justification for FGM/C

Islamic Scholars Find No Religious Justification for FGM/C

Following a series of discussions on Islam and FGM/C with religious leaders in Kenya’s Somali-dominated North Eastern Province, scholars agreed that infibulation should end, but did not achieve consensus on other aspects of FGM/C. Continuing steps include mobilizing Imams as community advocates against FGM/C and engaging communities in group discussions about justifications for continuing the practice. More info →
Mid-Term Review of Project: Practice Reduction and Awareness on Female Genital Mutilation (FGM)

Mid-Term Review of Project: Practice Reduction and Awareness on Female Genital Mutilation (FGM)

This report presents the outcome of a Mid-Term Review of the project “Practice Reduction and Awareness on Female Genital Mutilation” implemented by Young Women’s Christian Association (YWCA) Kenya in three geographical areas, Kisii, Meru and Kajiado. More info →
Mid-Term Review of Project: Practice Reduction and Awareness on Female Genital Mutilation (FGM)

Mid-Term Review of Project: Practice Reduction and Awareness on Female Genital Mutilation (FGM)

This report presents the outcome of a Mid-Term Review of the project “Practice Reduction and Awareness on Female Genital Mutilation” implemented by Young Women’s Christian Association (YWCA) Kenya in three geographical areas, Kisii, Meru and Kajiado. More info →
Egypt Demographic and Health Survey

Egypt Demographic and Health Survey

This document presents the 2008 Demographic and Health Survey conducted in Egypt. It was undertaken to provide estimates for key population indicators including fertility, contraceptive use, infant and child mortality, immunization levels, maternal and child health, and nutrition. To obtain this information, a nationally representative sample of 16,527 ever-married women age 15-49 was interviewed. More info →